The first annual March for the Missing will take place on Saturday, June 2, 2006. We will begin on a small scale and with growth and participation we will increase gradually. Our first March will be held in the area where Our Brennie disappeared.

The gathering point will be in Hunting Park. We will gather in the parking lot on the Old York Road side and march out of the park south on Old York Rd. We will turn East on Luzerne Ave to 9th, left on 9th northward back to the park. We will march through the park back to our starting point for a brief ceremony.

All families and friends of missing persons are invited to attend. Please email for more information.

Shamari Taylor Still Missing
ABOUT 11 p.m. on Saturday, August 29, 2006, Shamari Taylor and his young female companion were surrounded by a menacing pack of masked punks on the streets of Overbrook Park, according to police. The men - police say there were seven to 10 of them - flashed badges and guns and shoved Taylor, 26, and his companion into a car and sped off. Since then, Taylor - son of state Rep. John Myers - has not been seen or heard from. Six hours after the abductions, the ordeal was over for Taylor's unidentified companion, who was released on York Street near 31st in Strawberry Mansion. The next night, Myers' office released a statement. "On behalf of Rep. Myers and his family, we ask for your prayers at this time," it said. "We ask for anyone with knowledge of what happened to his son Shamari to come forward."
Mr. Taylor's 56-year-old mother and his sister, 21, were shot at the family's West Philadelphia home by two intruders the day after his disapperance, authorities said. The mother, shot in the head, was hospitalized in critical condition and later recovered. The sister was treated for a shoulder wound and released. Their names were not made public. Police consider the crimes connected, based on descriptions of the assailants provided by the female companion and the sister.
The companion reported that a group of seven to 10 men shoved them into a van at about 11 p.m., police Lt. John Walker said. She told police they were duct-taped and taken to an unknown location, possibly a warehouse. The woman said she was released at about 5 a.m. Sunday, but did not contact police until about 5 p.m., Lt. Walker said. Two hours later, two intruders -- who might have had a key -- entered the Taylor residence, Lt. Walker said. They shot the women and then rummaged through Mr. Taylor's bedroom, leaving with an undetermined amount of cash. Mr. Myers last spoke with his son a few weeks before the abduction. Nothing seemed amiss, he said.

This is a profile of a woman that I posted nearly two years ago. For some reason she has been on my mind. I believe the main reason is because she has been missing so long and I have never seen any publicity on her case. My prayers are with her family as they enter the 7th year of her disappearance. Most of all my prayers are with her now nearly 9 year old son who may not even remember her.

Aesha Amerah Muhammed

Date Of Birth: October 11, 1977
Age at Disappearance: 23 years oldHeight and Weight: 5'8-5'9, 135-140 pounds
Distinguishing Characteristics: Black hair, brown eyes. She has a gap between her upper from teeth.
Details of Disappearance: Muhammed was last seen at her residence in the vicinity of the 1600 block of north 56th Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on November 30, 2000. Her two-and-a-half year-old son disappeared with her but turned up several weeks later when he was dropped off at a church in New Jersey by an unknown individual. Muhammed has never been heard from again. Foul play is suspected in her case.
If you have any information about Aesha or know of her wherabouts contact the Philadelphia Police Department @ 215.685-3257.

Still Praying........

I looked through the online news archives and found this article. It will tell a little about her disappearance for those who don't know her story.

It amazed me because I remember thinking at that time that it had been a long time for Brennie to be missing - The story was done in July 1997. It had been just 5 months since her disappearance.

Fastforward to March 2007. It has now been 10 years and 24 days since Brennie has been gone. It has been only God's grace and our faith that He will bring to light everything that was done in secret, that sustains us from day to day.

The strangest thing for me is that in 10 years, I have not been able to cry over what has happened. I watched a video last night of Brennie and I having a ball at a barbecue in 1993. As I watched, I immediately remembered our conversations, our laughter, our silliness. I felt a longing to pick up the phone and call her... but at what number? Not to mention the fact that she doesn't have mine.

I watched the video over and over but, I didn't cry. If anything it made me more vigilant, gave me another wind so to speak. So today, I place another post on this site that I have dedicated to her......and I wait for the day when we will be able to laugh together again!

Here is the article......

Philadelphia Daily News (PA)
July 21, 1997
Author: Jamal E. Watson, Daily News Staff Writer
Edition: PMSection: LOCALPage: 06
Estimated printed pages: 3
Article Text:

Karen and Harvey Smith refuse to give up hope.

Every day, the Logan couple think about their missing 25-year-old daughter and pray for her safe return.

Brenwanda Smith, a SEPTA bus driver for two years, has been missing since February.
``We believe that our daughter is still alive and there are certain circumstances that are preventing her from getting in touch with us,'' said Harvey Smith.

Despite rallies at the place where Smith was last seen - SEPTA's Luzerne depot in North Philadelphia - fliers plastered across SEPTA buses, and a $1,000 reward offered by her friends, police have no clues as to her disappearance.

``We haven't got a thing,'' said Lt. John Scholly, of the Cheltenham police, which is handling the investigation because Smith lived in the township.
``We've followed up on every lead possible, but we keep hitting a dead-end.''

At 4 a.m. on Feb. 18, Brennie, as she is called by family and friends, reported to work much like any other day. At 7 that evening, as she walked near the Luzerne depot - long after her shift was over - she told co-workers she was waiting for a ride.
After that, she vanished.

Smith worked as a hold-down operator - a job where she filled in when regular bus operators were sick or on vacation, said SEPTA spokeswoman Barbara Siegel.
The agency made up fliers and put them on buses.

Smith's parents said she worked long hours and saved her money to pay for the Lynnewood Gardens apartment in Cheltenham, where she moved in January. Before landing her job at SEPTA, Smith, a Central High graduate, attended business school for a short time, and worked odd jobs at a bank.

``She was excited about having her own apartment for the first time,'' said Karen Smith, owner of a hair styling salon.

On the day she disappeared, Brenwanda Smith had a minor traffic accident about noon on Broad Street near Girard Avenue while driving the Route C bus. She went to the depot to fill out an accident report, SEPTA officials said. She left work for the day around 1:30 p.m. Two SEPTA colleagues saw her about 7 p.m. on Old York Road, near the depot. She declined an offer for a ride, saying she already had one.

Police said it did not appear that Smith made it to her apartment that night.
``Someone saw her get into a vehicle,'' says DeJuana Price, a close friend. ``Someone saw her that night.''

Harvey Smith said his daughter did not own a car. Sometimes he picked her up from work. Other times, she caught rides with co-workers, or took the bus.

Erica Sterling, Brenwanda's best friend, said, ``If you paged her she would always call you back right away.''

Police also said they find no reason to suggest the young woman fled willingly.
``Everyone that we've talked to says she was hard-working and clean as a whistle,'' noted Lt. Scholly. ``It scares us the most that she had not made any contact with family or friends,'' said Detective Mike Santarelli.

Soon after Cynthia McCrae learned her cousin was missing, she began paging Smith twice a day.
It almost became a ritual for McCrae. Sometimes, said McCrae, her phone would ring.
She could hear a television in the background, but the caller never spoke. Smith's beeper was cut off May 30.

Meanwhile, family members try to cope, clinging to their faith to help them through the difficult period. They also continue to hope someone will come forward with information that will help reunite them with Smith.

Anyone with information about the disappearance of Brenwanda Smith should call Cheltenham police 215-885-1600.

Caption:PHOTOHarvey and Karen Smith with picture of missing daughter Brenwanda, a SEPTA bus driver who hasn't been heard from since last February (GEORGE MILLER/ DAILY NEWS)PHOTO
Memo:Mystery Disappearance
Copyright (c) 1997 Philadelphia Daily NewsRecord Number: 9707220196

Vital Statistics at Time of Disappearance
Missing Since:
June 21, 2006 from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Classification: Endangered Missing
Date of Birth: November 7, 1925
Age: 80 years old
Height and Weight: 5'11, 128 pounds
Distinguishing Characteristics: African-American male. Black hair, brown eyes. Boozer's nicknames are Jimmy, Jim and J. He is missing one of his upper front teeth and he has previously broken his right hand. He has a small scar above his right eye near his hairline.
Clothing/Jewelry Description: A red and blue short-sleeved plaid shirt, a white long-sleeve thermal undershirt, a tan jacket, tan pants, brown shoes, a white cap, a dark brown belt and a Timex watch.
Medical Conditions: Boozer suffers from dementia and requires daily medication for a heart condition.

Details of Disappearance
Boozer was last seen left his residence on foot in the 5800 block of Montrose in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania at 8:00 a.m. on June 21, 2006 to take the train to a doctor's appointment at Wills Eye Hospital. He arrived safely at the doctor's office in the vicinity of 8th Street and Walnut and left afterwards at 11:30 a.m. He never made it home and has never been heard from again.
Boozer's wife describes him as an extremely shy man who would be unlikely to seek out attention even if he needed help. She reported him as a missing person at 5:00 p.m. on the day of his disappearance. Due to his medical conditions, there is fear for Boozer's safety. He was carrying a brown wallet at the time of his disappearance. His case remains unsolved.

Investigating Agency

If you have any information concerning this case, please contact:

Philadelphia Police Department

Today's posting alarms me. This gentleman was 80 years old at the time of his disappearance. It is unlikely that he met with foul play. It is my guess that he got ill and was hospitalized. Due to his dementia, he probably did not know who he was. It is possible however that he was mugged which could have traumatized him and he slipped further into an amnesiac. I hate to play the race card again but, as a resident of Philadelphia, I have seen several white senior citizens on the news when they have gone missing and are victims of Alzheimers. I have yet to see any publicized missing black seniors. I believe the same in the case of Alice Artison who disappeared on July 22, 2004. These two grandparents could very well be victims of a careless municipality. They may be a Jane and John Doe in a local nursing home or state close to the loved ones that search for them daily.

10 YEARS, 18 DAYS.......
and I'm not giving up! I will find out where you are and who is responsible.
Today for some reason, I am feeling especially hopeful, full of faith. I had a dream recently that you returned to us and I cried while telling you that I never stopped looking for you. The possibility of that day is what I strive for. The opportunity to tell you that you are so loved and mean so much to me that I never ceased to search for you.
I am determined not to let anyone forget you. Even people who never met you will know who you are! I am still emailing Oprah. Still trying to contact Montell. I have emailed Steve Harvey, John Walsh. I will get national coverage someway, somehow. We will get your face out there and we will get to the bottom of this. The responsible party will not go unpunished although I'm sure they are in a comfort zone right now. JUSTICE WILL BE SERVED! The GOD we serve is too just and righteous for this to go unsolved. We have to be strong in the Lord and in the Power of His Might!
I remind myself that this did not come to stay....IT CAME TO PASS!!!! Looking forward to the day that you return to us! I LOVE YOU PUNKIN!!!!
P.S. To the families of Aesha Muhammad, Robin Ellis, Marilyn Lanier, Aaron Green, Allen Briscoe, Eulace King, Shameeka Dixon-Gordon, Daphne Philisa Jones, Tyesha Patrice Bell, Dymashal Lashon Cullins, Latoya Natasha Thomas, Shirley Geanes, Kireasha Pam Linkorne, Marcie Crane, Alice Artison and the countless others....KEEP THE FAITH - GOD ANSWERS PRAYER!
How long must you wait to file a Missing Persons Report?
A. 24 hours
B. 12 hours
C. 2 hours
D. I'm not sure

If you chose any of the answers above, then you need to learn the facts.

A person can and should be reported missing as soon as you realize they are missing and something is wrong. Children may be reported right away. As for a missing adult, that can very from state to state. Why assume?! Just contact your local authorities and get the facts. So the answer is RIGHT AWAY!

The first 3 hours are the most critical in any missing persons case. When you suspect someone is missing, you need to take immediate action because everything you will need to do will use up that valuable time. You will want to do as many of the things listed below, as fast and soon as you can.
What To Do First
The first thing to do may seem pretty obvious, but when you suspect someone is missing, there may be some things you haven't thought of.
1. Check around your house and neighborhood- TRY NOT TO DISTURB POTENTIAL EVIDENCE- EVEN IN YOUR HOME! ESPECIALLY THEIR PERSONAL ITEMS and things in their room. But do check in their closet, under the bed, in vehicles- INCLUDING THE TRUNK OR CARGO AREA. Check anywhere that is small enough for that person to fit into. Look around your neighborhood, in culverts, ditches, ponds, streams, bushes, woods, BUT DON'T GO ALONE IF YOU DON'T HAVE TO!

2. Call their friends and other family members- They may know something you don't. CHECK YOUR CALLER ID FIRST AND CHECK YOUR OUTGOING CALLS. perhaps one of the last calls going out or coming in could yield direction or information on where they might have gone or who they might be with. Check that before you make so many calls that the information risks being lost. Get a notebook and write the numbers down in your caller ID list before you start calling. Have someone else grab a pencil while you read the numbers off to them to make it faster and to reassure it is accurate. Include the times the calls were made or received. Have the people you call, call people THEY know that know the person who is missing. No one is going to care if their house is called twice or more when you are concerned someone is missing. Call hospitals, jails, or other areas you believe they could possibly be. Once you have taken these steps, it is time to call 911.

Where do I file the report?
You need to contact the Law Enforcement Agency that is nearest to where the person was last known to have been. You can do this by phone. You can also call 911 and give them that information. They will want to know from where the person is missing, who the person is, a physical description, age, what they were last seen wearing, and what they were doing or where they were headed. Did they have a car, what else is missing, what did they have with them, and why you think they are missing.

Other information that can be helpful can be found below in the "What you should do and know to be prepared if someone you know becomes missing." Hopefully you will have read that information BEFORE you needed it. Better yet, hopefully the information you have read will never be needed.

After you have followed the above steps and contacted the authorities, invite a few close friends and/or family members over. Stay close to the phone and keep your group small. You will need support and someone to talk with. Make sure they too do not disturb any possible evidence before investigators do their job. Only allow the group you invited over to come to your house. Ask that others group at a neighbors, relatives, or another friends home. This keeps things such as fingerprints to a minimum and helps assure potential evidence is left undisturbed during the initial investigation.

Make a list of names, phone numbers, and addresses for persons phone numbers your unsure of. Include the missing persons neighbors, friends, family members, teachers, school mates, coaches, coworkers, church members, organizations they belong to, and others who know your loved ones. Authorities will need that list to aid in their investigation.

KEEP A NOTEBOOK: Make a copy of that list for yourself as well. To your list add contact numbers for the police who will be investigating the case, media, and any other important numbers. In the same notebook, keep a log of everything Law Enforcement says to you. List everything they take from your home.
Know Your RightsYou have the right to make recommendations and ask questions of law enforcement and others. They are working for you and the person that is missing. Don't be afraid to speak out.

Determine who will be doing what. Each group that forms should be given an area to search, or know what their role within the group is. Perhaps helping to set up a central meeting place, provide meals, a calling center, organizing search parties and contacting search members, gathering email addresses, sign up sheets, printing posters or taking the information somewhere to have them done for you (see underlined info in paragraph below), decide who will take incoming calls and have them document the calls such as who called, what time, and a brief description of the conversation, such as: called to offer help with search, meals, offer condolences, newspaper calling for latest details, etc.... Assign someone to contact missing persons organizations and the media. Some of these things you may wish to do yourself or have another immediate family member do, but be sure to keep your contact phone line open as much as possible. Use a friends cell phone or have another family member call from a neighbors. When the media comes for an interview, try to be short and to the point so that the most important details are what they air and print. They are your most valuable asset because they help to get the information in front of thousands of viewers and readers.
Missing Person PostersGather some recent photos together. Try to get various angles of their face as to show the shape of their nose and and other distinguishing characteristics. Make a missing persons poster. Be sure to include a clear picture or pictures, physical description, distinguishing characteristics- like talks with a lisp or accent, has a limp, wears braces, wears dentures, or what ever makes them unique. Include contact information , where the person was last seen, what they were wearing, If any of their personal belongings are missing or were left behind such as purse, wallet, vehicle, backpack, and so on. Medications they are taking. Some police departments, organizations, or businesses may help or offer their services for free, but you may wish to get a head start by having someone print several to start with.

Have groups spread out in various directions to distribute the posters. Begin within the first 5 miles of the place the person was last known to have been, and within 5 miles of their home. Put one up EVERYWHERE! Make several copies so you can flood the area with the posters. If you do not have a computer and a printer, send someone to the printers or ask that your friends who do have printers and computers to help. Have someone get ink cartridges if you decide to do them yourself so that you will be able to make plenty. Some posters may blow away or come down and you will want one of your groups to recheck that the posters are still up and replace any that are missing. Go to businesses, use telephone poles, go door to door. Anywhere you can find to get the posters in the publics eye.

Stephanie Marie Gant-Brady

Missing Since: April 8, 1984 from Baltimore, Maryland
Classification: Endangered Missing
Date of Birth: October 17, 1944
Age: 39 years old
Height and Weight: 5'3, 110 pounds
Distinguishing Characteristics: African-American female. Brown hair, brown eyes. Gant-Brady wears eyeglasses or contact lenses. Her nickname is Penny.
Clothing/Jewelry Description: An opal ring and a pinky ring set with a small diamond.
Medical Conditions: Gant-Brady was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 1978 and has difficulty walking as a result of her condition. She utilizes a cane and a wheelchair to get around, but she had neither with her when she vanished.

Details of Disappearance

Gant-Brady was last seen in Baltimore, Maryland on April 8, 1984. She resided in the 4600 block of Horizon Circle in the Woodlawn area at the time. After her disappearance, Gant-Brady's male companion stated she had traveled to London, England to write a book. However, Gant-Brady never obtained a passport, did not pick up her last paycheck, and left all of her personal belongings, including her cane and wheelchair, behind when she vanished.

Gant-Brady has one son. She got a bachelor's degree in sociology from Morgan State University and was attempting a master's degree from the University of Baltimore in 1984. She was the first African-American woman to reach the rank of lieutenant in the Maryland National Guard. She was also a member of the Governor's Committee for the Handicapped. Gant-Brady was employed as a substitute middle and elementary school teacher at the time of her disappearance. Her case remains unsolvd.

Family Reflections of Stephanie

Helen Gant-Fox describes her missing daughter, Stephanie, as a loving and generous person. A good daughter, a good mother, an achiever. She said that Helen always kept a positive attitude. She quoted Confucious, “he who has hope has everything.” Stephanie, who loved music, tennis and attending concerts, was also a believer. Helen remembers Stephanie’s favorite prayer was the Serenity prayer. She had a positive influence on everyone around her, and poured all she could into her family.

Stephanie Marie Gant-Brady – A Penny for Your Thoughts: Words from her son Paul.
“ ‘Sometimes a man seeks what he hath lost; and from that place, and time, wherein he misses it, his mind runs back, from place to place, and time to time, to find where and when he had it; that is to say, to find some certain and limited time and place in which to begin a method of seeking. Again, from thence, his thoughts run over the same places and times to find what action or occasion might make him lose it. This we call remembrance, or calling to mind.’” – Thomas Hobbs

It’s never easy, Paul states, writing about someone you love, that’s been missing for so long, but never difficult expressing how wonderful they are. This is my mother Stephanie Marie Gant-Brady, affectionately “Penny.”

Born October 17, 1944, Penny was destined to be an overachiever in all she set out to do. Upon leaving Morgan State University, she joined the Maryland National Guard, being one of three women to graduate from the school’s 18-year history (1997) of Officer Candidate School as a Second Lieutenant. In 1978, she was diagnosed with having Multiple Sclerosis. She accepted the diagnosis, went out and had her hair done, joined a group to aid the disabled, and decided, life goes on.

She excelled even with a disability that affected her physically. ; commissioned to the Governor’s Committee for hiring the handicapped, a Resource Specialist for Baltimore Citizens for Housing for the Disabled; she returned to Morgan to receive an undergraduate degree in Sociology, wrote a news column for the disabled community in the Afro American newspaper and wrote the astrology page in the syndicated Dawn magazine. For recreation, she coached a boys little league basketball team (ages 11 and 12) and was an after school recreation leader. She went from coach to Ms. Brady, substitute school teacher at the elementary and junior high school in Baltimore County. At the time of her disappearance, she was working on her Master’s degree at the University of Baltimore.

She was the perfect mother, and “adoptive” mother to many children and young people, a respected adult, pillar of the community and an outgoing and caring person for all. She lived for the moment; a dreamer that made her dreams reality and a strong advocate for what she believed in, people.

As a single parent, Penny joined Parents without Partners, which she made many new friends to network with, attended meetings and social functions. She showed that her disability did not stop her from dancing to roller skating. She loved her family unconditionally as the eldest of three, she took the values instilled in her by her mother and aunt and applied them to all of her endeavors, including being an inspiration to her brother, sister and cousin.

But it was only one person that made up Penny’s world, her ‘soul’ inspiration, and that honor is me, her only child. My mother is/was my best friend, confidant, my completeness. She raised me to be independent, loving, and understanding. She proved that anything can be overcome, once you put your mind to it. Thought she may be a little disappointed with how my life has changed, but a mother’s love is a mother’s love. Today she is a grandmother of (3) beautiful grandchildren who all have one of her unique and loving traits. I can only imagine how spoiled they would be if you were here.

Unfortunately, we will never forget that beautiful Sunday afternoon, April 8, 1984, the very last words ever spoken to and from you was ‘I love you.’ You strongly believed these words should always be the last things spoken, so you’ll never regret not saying it.

It is those words that I hold near and cherish in my memory of you. They make me persevere in this quest. Many have moved on and light endless candles in remembrance, it’s that love we share that won’t allow me to give up. Only (3) truly know what happened; you, God and that person whose refused to disclose your true whereabouts. You live in the hearts and minds of your family, grandchildren, and friends. You’re in my soul and spread around through my love, you are my inspiration, best friend, and greatest mother. I love you forever.

Your one and only son, Paul.

If you have any information concerning this case, please contact: Baltimore County Police Department 410-887-3943
Vital Statistics at Time of Disappearance
Missing Since:
February 18, 1997 from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Classification: Endangered Missing

Age: 24 years old

Height and Weight: 5'9, 135 - 150 pounds

Distinguishing Characteristics: Brown hair, brown eyes. Smith's hair was styled in braids at the time of her disappearance. Her nickname is Brennie.

Clothing Description: A light blue uniform shirt and dark blue uniform pants. A SEPTA logo was on her shirt sleeve; an image of the logo is posted above.

Details of Disappearance: Brennie worked as a bus driver for SEPTA, the public transit system, in 1997; she had held the job since 1994. She was last seen after work at the Luzerne depot near Old York Road and Luzerne Avenue in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on February 18, 1997. She was reported missing that same day. Brennie has never been heard from again. Authorities have speculated that Juan Covington, a diagnosed schizophrenic and former SEPTA employee who has been charged with two murders and is suspected of several more, may have been involved in her case. We believe this is a total falsehood. Smith's case remains open and unsolved. She moved from Philadelphia to Cheltenham, Pennsylvania shortly before her disappearance therefore; Cheltenham police are investigating her case. Please contact them at 215-885-1600 with any information.